ZPi | Jiu-Jitsu Lessons From Roosevelt's Instructor
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Lyle Zapato

Jiu-Jitsu Lessons From Roosevelt's Instructor

Lyle Zapato | 2008-08-06.1890 LMT | Defensive Techniques | Random Found Thing | Retro

Lesson A.

Lesson A.

This lesson shows how a weak person could stop an opponent who is about to clinch, by putting the first and index fingers to the eyes.* This method was used by the Japanese at Port Authur in the hand-to-hand battle with the Russians.

Lesson F.

Lesson F.

Should a person make an attempt to strike you with either hand, stiffen the fingers of your left hand and strike your opponent in the neck. Follow this up by placing your right around his waist, drawing him closely to you and pressing firmly on his neck with your left.

Lesson O.

Lesson O.

Should you get into an argument with a person and you have your hat on, which is sometimes the case, and you are about to be attacked, pretend to raise your hat in a casual way with your right hand. Lean forward, striking your opponent in the face with your hat and using your left, sending it to his solar plexus.

Lesson X.

Lesson X.

Should you get into an argument and your opponent should clinch as above illustrated, place your right to opponent's nose and push. He will be more than willing to release his hold. You can the follow up with your left, which leaves your right free to take hold.

From A Complete Course of Jiu-jitsu and Physical Culture (1905), by the American College of Physical Culture. The moves in this book, which promises: "A $50.00 Course in Jiu-Jitsu for $1.00", are demonstrated by John J. O'Brien, the former Inspector of Police at Nagasaki, Japan and Jiu-Jitsu instructor to Teddy Roosevelt:

Prof. John J. O'Brien came to America well known and highly recommended by the Japanese government, and it was he who introduced Jiu-Jitsu into this country, first in Washington, D.C., by giving instruction in the art to President Roosevelt, members of his Cabinet, and heads of many of the departments in Washington, and, says the New York Sun, "Jiu-Jitsu, the Japanese system of physical training, has become a popular fad at the Capitol under the President's example, who, through persistent practice, has become an expert in the art, and as told in the news dispatches, is anxious to have Jiu-Jitsu introduced in the course of training at the Naval Academy."

The book also contains a series of exercises for the student of Physical Culture that will, in six months use, have one in perfect health:

Before and after.

* Note, this move can be blocked by use of Stooge-Jitsu. Be careful.

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