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Lyle Zapato

Les Pieuvres de Paris

Lyle Zapato | 2015-08-10.6821 LMT | Cephalopods | Entertainment | Retro

Decadent Parisian women partying on the back of an octopus.
Cliquez pour agrandir.

Les Pieuvres de Paris ("The Octopuses of Paris") is a French novel by Pierre Zaccone. Sadly, it's not about giant octopuses hosting drunken parties on their backs as they float down the Seine. Much like the equally misleading Trail of the Octopus, these octopuses are only metaphoric.

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Lyle Zapato

Russian Psychic Espionage

Lyle Zapato | 2015-07-28.4508 LMT | Mind Control | Politics

Is the Russian government basing its national policies on intel gathered using mind-reading? Of course it is.

Oleg Kashin, in an article for the Russian Free Press (translated to English in The Guardian), shows how Nikolai Patrushev, the secretary of the Russian Security Council, slipped in a bit of psychical intelligence (PSYINT in spook speak) about Madeleine Albright during an interview with Kommersant.

Kashin, being orthanoiac, dismisses PSYINT as "hallucinations" and bemoans the distinct, isolated culture of the Kremlin:

Within their circle they speak a language all their own, their folklore and humour are unknown to us. They believe in things of which we have not the slightest inkling. Their superstitions, horoscopes, saints, fears, hopes, their good, their bad — all these have existed for a long time and mutate in ways foreign to us, the ordinary Russian people.

While all that is certainly true, there's more going on here than Kashin allows. As explained in my analysis of Belyaev's The Lord of the World, Russia has in the past been less than secretive about its, and other's, psychotronic technologies, and Patrushev's indiscretion fits that pattern.

The origin of the Albright PSYINT was explained by retired KGB general Boris Ratnikov in a 2006 interview with the government newspaper Rossiyskaya Gazeta, which includes other behind-the-scenes mind-reading intrigues between the East and West blocs of the New World Order and typical Kremlin humblebragging about their psychotronic abilities. Here's a rough translation (with analysis following):

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The Monorailist

The Folly Of The Aircraft Carrier Bridge

The Monorailist | 2015-07-25.8528 LMT | Monorail Danger | Politics | Cascadia

Once again, people around the world are transfixed by an absurd new idea from the myopic overseers of Puget Sound transportation. This time it's a plan to build a bridge out of aircraft carriers -- a bridge for carrying automobiles, of course.

You fools! You unelevated fools!

In April of this year, Two-Thousand and Fifteen of our Common Era -- fifteen years too far into what should have been our promised Future -- State Rep. Jesse Young (R-Automobilist) proposed squandering $90,000 of the transportation budget to study the feasibility of shackling together Bremerton and Port Orchard with decommissioned carriers.

The above satellite photo mock-up shows the proposed "Military Tribute" bridge anchored in the north at the interchange of State Automobile Routes 3 and 304 and lolling lackadaisically south-by-southeast across the Sinclair Inlet to Ross Point to spew motorists onto SAR 166. To fully span the roughly 3700 ft. gap would require three US Navy supercarriers (some of the desired carriers can be seen in dock at the Naval Shipyard in the upper right), although Rep. Young prefers two and his proposal allows the incorporation of as few as one. Even in their boldest steps, Automobilists travel with timidity!

Many have already criticized the folly of such a plan: its economic questionability, the unavailability of the carriers, numerous structural and environmental issues. The most fundamental flaw, however, is its pointlessness; not only does it merely perpetuate the continued Malaise of Automobility, but there is already a road between those two places!

Tellingly, the illustration being passed around the media, both social and mainstream, by automobile apologists (see: Daily Mail, et al.) is deceptively cropped to hide the end of Sinclair Inlet, giving the impression that the bridge would allow access between two otherwise unreachable points, thus serving some purpose beyond base vanity. In fact, as my uncropped illustration clearly shows, this bridge would only shave off less than 4 miles from a commute between Bremerton and Port Orchard (the bypassed route is about 4.5 miles and the bridge would be about three-quarters of a mile, including the necessary ramps to reach the deck height).

In all the talk about the impracticality of the scheme, what hasn't been much discussed is the impact this looming car-carrier would have on the area. Rep. Young claims tourism from the bridge will boost the local economy, but there's no reason tourists couldn't be allowed to simply visit the carriers while docked, much as they already can the destroyer USS Turner Joy. Is the privilege of paying a toll to drive on them for less than a minute really that much of a tourism draw?

Regardless of what meager tourist dollars the bridge may raise for the cities it imposes upon, one thing is certain: The Aircraft Carrier Bridge would bring economic ruin to Gorst!

Gorst! Listless Gorst! Haphazardly (with an emphasis on hazard) formed from the confusing confluence of automobile routes, addled motorists jockeying for lanes as they careen railless around a high-speed u-turn past Gorst's few businesses that eke an existence by pandering to the Autocracy. A bridge that would bypass Gorst -- while bringing relief from the dangerous slew of automobiles -- would take away what little economic activity came from those drivers who misjudged the trajectory and escaped orbit into some auto dealership or crash-landed into a drive-thru bikini barista.

Like an addict who uses not for pleasure but to avoid the pain of withdrawal, how could Gorst go on without its bottleneck? But could this sad state of affairs actually be an opportunity for a New Beginning? Even Automobilists think something must change at Gorst, if only someone could cut the Gorstian knot of traffic.

I have an audacious plan to do just that, one that will uplift Gorst so that not only may it stand on its own, free of the Tyranny of the Tire, but be transformed into a Beacon of Civilization in a smog-enshrouded wilderness:

We must transform Gorst into the premier Regional Monorail Hub!

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Lyle Zapato

Congolese Brain-Sucking Octopus

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-29.4390 LMT | Cephalopods | Food | Retro

In 1902, English language newspapers brought word from the Congo, via a rather dubious source, that an unknown freshwater cryptopus with a hankerin' for human thought-meat was prowling the Uele river (from the Sept. 7 San Francisco Call, also reprinted elsewhere):

TERRIBLE OCTOPUS OF THE UELLE RIVER

It Hunts the Natives and Feeds Upon the Brains of Its Human Prey.

A Belgian officer just returned from the Congo Free State reports that in the caverns of the Uelle River there dwells a species of octopus that presents a grave danger to all who navigate the river in small boats.

The strange beasts are called "megwe" by the natives, and are very numerous in the neighborhood of the station of the Amadis, owing to the number of rocks and caves in that region. They attack the native canoes, capsizing them easily with their tentacles and, according to their state of hunger, seizing one or two men.

The octopus drags his human prey to his cavern and there, without inflicting the slightest external wounds, feeds on his victim's brains by inserting the points of his tentacles in his nostrils. He generally keeps his prey fifteen hours, then lets the body float out on the river.

"I was an eye witness to a disaster of this kind," says the Belgian. "A canoe was capsized in the river and one of the three occupants disappeared. When the survivors swam ashore they told us that an octopus had turned their boat over and carried off their companion.

"The next morning about 9 o'clock the body was found floating and no trace of any wound could be found, while the only abnormal appearance was the swollen state of the nostrils. On examination it was found that the brains had been extracted. The natives of the Uelle all dread the 'megwe.' while those of the Itimbri know nothing of its existence."

It turns out this report was over two years old -- the officer hadn't "just" returned (and wasn't "Belgian", but that's another matter). It went viral, 1900s style, because everything old is new again.

However, I'm leading the post with it since it's pithy and things are about to get more wordy, ambiguous, and French.

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Lyle Zapato

Indian Teleportation Accident, Circa 1878

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-19.0880 LMT | Technology | Retro

Was the plot of the original The Fly ripped from the headlines... of 80 years previously?

In 1878 a report from Bombay reached Australia describing an amazing and terrible new invention (reprint from The Brisbane Courier, July 27):

The Teleport.

The telephone and the phonograph are no doubt very wonderful examples (says the Melbourne Daily Telegraph) of the purposes to which the power of electricity may be applied, but these novelties begin to sink into insignificance before the still more recent strides of science. The newest contrivance is called a teleport, and is described by a Bombay paper "as an apparatus by which man can be reduced into infinitesimal atoms, transmitted through a wire, and reproduced safe and sound at the other end." The apparatus, according to the Indian paper, consists of a powerful battery, a large metal disc, a bell-shaped glass house, and a large iron funnel connected with the wire. An experiment is described as follows:—"A dog was placed on the metal disc, and a 'powerful current' was applied to it. After a while the animal disappeared, and was found at the other end gnawing a bone, just as it was doing before it was 'transported.' Afterwards a boy was experimented upon. Under the glass house, it is reported, the inventor of the machine placed a Goanese boy, Pedro—who was grinning as if he thought it a good joke—and we suspect it was not the first time he had been in that house. The current was again applied to the under part of the disc, and the same effect was observed as with the dog. The house was instantaneously filled with a vaporous man, whose features and parts were quite distinct until they disappeared. Even the grin was discernible as a mere film of vapour—in fact, it seemed to us that the grin remained even after the body had disappeared. In fifteen seconds Pedro was gone; but they found him also at the end of the wire. It was then attempted to send the boy and the dog along at once, but by an unfortunate accident the 'infinitesimal atoms' of the boy and those of the dog got 'mixed' in transitu, and the result was that they both looked dreadfully unnatural creatures." At least, so says the Bombay paper in its account of the first experiments with the "teleport." It says that by means of the teleport a man will be able to travel from India to England by submarine cable in a few minutes, but unfortunately there is always the danger that the "disintegrated atoms" of one man may become mixed with those of another, as in the case of Pedro and the dog, and for this reason it is feared that the teleport will not supersede the railways—at least, not so far as the passenger traffic is concerned.

Left unanswered, fortunately, was "How does Pedrodog eat?"

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Lyle Zapato

Prof. E. L. Scharf's Negative Gravity

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-17.9681 LMT | Technology | Retro

Will levitation be a public utility like electricity? Will flying battleships patrol the skies, or sea-borne ones be forced aloft by submarine subterfuge? Will city planners move skyscrapers around like chess pieces, lifting them into the air with ease and plonking them down in better locations? Will famous monuments tour the world for everyone to see? Will we execute criminals by electrically charging them and humanely propelling them into space to a Saganian poetic fate? Will our enemies try to secretly do the same to us against our will?

In 1903, all these possibilities seemed tantalizingly within reach.

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Lyle Zapato

Tinfoil Wrapping Hats

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-14.4860 LMT | Aluminum | Mind Control | Fashion | Retro

The above is from Popular Mechanics, Oct., 1927. As per my previous post, Julian Huxley is believed to be the first to depict "tinfoil hats" in fiction, however he did not invent them. Paranoids have been using deflector beanies since the early 1920s when aluminum foil became widely available to the public in the form of food packaging. The Mind Control Elite, whom Huxley rubbed shoulders with, have known about them for far longer.

While the article is from over a year after Huxley's first publication of "The Tissue-Culture King" (Apr. 1926), it illustrates an already mature paranoid culture of deflective headwear use. Of course, paranoids had to pretend they were merely decorating their hats, hence the inclusion of "other fancy wrappings" with no deflective properties -- their true purpose of freeing themselves from the psychotronic grip of the Forces of Mind Control would obviously subject them to increased attention from same. That this "decorative" fad ceased shortly after it was covered in the popular press is not surprising; paranoids started putting foil wrappings under their hats to ensure discretion.

Lyle Zapato

Julian Huxley's "The Tissue-Culture King"

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-13.0810 LMT | Mind Control | Aluminum | Entertainment | Fashion | Retro


Hascombe shows off his incredible animal monstrosities.

"The Tissue-Culture King" is a short story by Julian Huxley first published in The Yale Review in Apr. 1926, and later in Amazing Stories, Aug. 1927. It's notable for containing reputedly the earliest use in fiction of an anti-mind-control foil deflector beanie -- colloquially known among orthonoids as a "tinfoil hat".

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Lyle Zapato

Richmond Against Mind Control

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-07.4290 LMT | Mind Control | Politics | General Paranoia

Last month the City Council of Richmond, CA (about 50 miles southeast of Bohemian Grove) passed Resolution 51-15 in support of the Space Preservation Act and the Space Preservation Treaty (PDF of resolution).

The Space Preservation Act of 2001 (H.R.2977) was a bill originally introduced by then Ohio Representative Dennis Kucinich in the US Congress. It called for a reaffirmation that "activities in space should be devoted to peaceful purposes for the benefit of all mankind" and a permanent ban on space-based weapons, including not only conventional missiles, but also:

land-based, sea-based, or space-based systems using radiation, electromagnetic, psychotronic, sonic, laser, or other energies directed at individual persons or targeted populations for the purpose of information war, mood management, or mind control of such persons or populations; [...] exotic weapons systems such as [...] chemtrails

The bill was not enacted into law (of course), but that can't stop paranoid-leaning local governments such as the Richmond City Council from passing resolutions in support of it. Unfortunately, being the first local government to take a stand against psychotronic and chemtrailular warfare has led to unintended consequences -- "Richmond police have been inundated with calls for help from people who feel under attack from space-based weaponry":

... the Police Department has been fielding calls from people throughout the world who feel targeted by anything from surveillance to mind control to insidious nanotechnology.

"We are getting numerous requests from individuals all over the country -- some even from other countries related to the Council's recent resolution," police Chief Chris Magnus said in a statement released by the mayor's office. "Richmond now seems to be known as the 'resource or helpers' for folks from many states with a myriad of mental health and other problems."

ATTN. FELLOW PARANOIDS: If your mental health is being negatively affected by space-based psychotronic weapons, or you are suffering other problems such as chemtrail-related infections, please do not contact the Richmond police. The city of Richmond does not have the resources to dismantle the influencing machines of the Global Forces of Mind Control on their own. Worse still, the over-enthusiastic response from the paranoid community is actually giving the Forces of Mind Control -- who even now are focusing their satellites on those Richmond officials in need of opinion correction -- a pretext to discredit the resolution's strong anti-mind-control stance. Until more city councils, township boards, home owners' associations, and other assorted local governing bodies join the resistance and are able to pool their resources, you should be discrete and protect yourself.

Lyle Zapato

Alexander Belyaev's The Lord of the World

Lyle Zapato | 2015-06-03.8860 LMT | Mind Control | NWO | Retro | Fashion


Would-be global mind-controller Stirner, in anti-mind-control
mesh-suit, confronts his Russian nemesis Kaczynski, seated.

This illustration is for the 1926 Russian novel The Lord of the World (Властелин мира) by Alexander Belyaev (also transliterated as Beliaev or Belyayev). I'm not sure what edition the image is actually from; it could be a later reprint. The story is about a man who tries to take over the world using mind control.

Although Belyaev is well-known in Russia, most of his work (see the end for more examples) doesn't appear to have been translated into English until recently, if at all. Someone named Maria K. has been releasing translations since 2012, including this one as Ruler of the World (I haven't read her version so I can't comment on the quality). Because it may not be that accessible to English speakers, here's a detailed synopsis based on a machine translation of the original (or skip below for my analysis):

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